How to Make & Use a Scratch Stock for Woodworking

How to Make & Use a Scratch Stock for Woodworking

David Ray Pine shows how to make & use a scratch stock for creating custom wood moldings. Links to David’s classes: https://woodandshop.com/school

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16 Comments

  1. Genardus Faberus on June 19, 2022 at 9:03 pm

    A great way to save money from router bits. Thank you and greetings from Buenos Aires.

  2. John Purser on June 19, 2022 at 9:04 pm

    Thank you. I’d heard of "scratch stock" but had the wrong idea what they were about. I guess you learn something new every day…if you’re not REAL careful!

  3. JohnnyD WoodWorks on June 19, 2022 at 9:08 pm

    Love your channel keep up the great work!

  4. Charles Kyler on June 19, 2022 at 9:09 pm

    I recently made a scratch stock to put a bead around a vent opening in a section of pine baseboard. I could no get a clean bead when working across the grain. Any suggestions to working cross grain with scratch stocks?
    Thanks

  5. Joel Smith on June 19, 2022 at 9:16 pm

    I was wondering how woodworkers of old added profiles to curves….now I know!

  6. Charles Stanford on June 19, 2022 at 9:18 pm

    Great stuff Ray!

  7. slowerandolder on June 19, 2022 at 9:18 pm

    Save your broken hacksaw blades for these. Shape them with a dremel.

  8. Bill K. on June 19, 2022 at 9:20 pm

    Great demonstration Mr. Pine, thanks for sharing it.

  9. PRM on June 19, 2022 at 9:22 pm

    Caveman technique

  10. Justin Revard on June 19, 2022 at 9:27 pm

    This guy needs his own channel/segment showing his obviously vast knowledge

  11. JC on June 19, 2022 at 9:30 pm

    I did find this quite useful. I’ve seen all sort of patterns and information on these, and was in need of making one, and this was he first video that popped up. I really enjoy the rough "scrap wood" approach to your scratch stock cutters, and I was able to do just that. A broken hacksaw blade, a few minutes with a bench grinder and a Dremel, and 2 small scraps of maple with a 7/8 x 1/4 deep notch cut out of the centre base (just quickly cut on the radial arm saw), and I was able to scratch the stock I needed (some very tiny flutes for mini column plinth toppers on a reproduction clock case). It’s surprising how shallow the cuts actually need to be to get a nice profile.

  12. Резные Поделки on June 19, 2022 at 9:32 pm

    Очень интересно,спасибо!

  13. William Carpenter on June 19, 2022 at 9:33 pm

    Great to see a fellow lefty working with tools. I appreciate the simplicity of the lesson and materials. Seems like it will save thousands of dollars over the price of a wide variety of router bits. Thanks for sharing.

  14. mark goode on June 19, 2022 at 9:34 pm

    Very helpful and interesting. Thanks for sharing. Best wishes

  15. Tim Brosnan on June 19, 2022 at 9:41 pm

    I’ve just started to work on developing skills for Federal Style furniture and I found this video invaluable. Thanks and best wishes for a great 2020 to you and the rest of the Wood and Shop community!

  16. Tom Denny on June 19, 2022 at 9:44 pm

    This simple scratch stock operation opens whole new posiblilties of adding decoration to projects. Thank you.

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